Indiana University

Indiana University Journalism

All Courses

Below is an expandable list of all courses at IU Journalism. Some are offered spring only, others in fall semesters only. Some classes are offered only once a year or occasionally. For more information about the courses, see the course information page. Check the course listing for current courses and syllabi (if available).

Graduate

JOUR-J500 Introduction to Mass Media Research
Description: (cr. 3)
Seminar on content analysis, experiments, survey methods, qualitative research, historical and legal methodology. Development of media research proposals.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J501 Public Affairs Reporting
Description: (cr. 3)
Reporting and publishing in a hyper-local news environment, on government and other areas of public interest.
JOUR-J502 Quantitative Research Methods for Journalists
Description: (cr. 3)
Open to graduate students only. The purpose of this course is to teach students about research/methodology and scientific evaluation as it is applied to all mass communication professions, from investigative journalism to public relations and advertising. This is a hands-on course. The primary objective is to teach students how to collect, manage, evaluate, interpret and understand data. The course will focus entirely on quantitative methodologies that journalists and communication practitioners commonly encounter in their daily professional lives, and it will help students engage in data analysis, and work toward a better understanding of scientific and social-scientific methodology.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J505 Intensive Reporting, Writing, and Editing Workshop
Description: (cr. 3)
1:30-4:30 pm, Daily, EP 210. Open to Graduate Students only. Obtain on-line authorization from department. Above course required for the broadcast track.
Monday, July 30 – Friday, August 17.
This course introduces graduate students to the fundamental practices and principles of writing, reporting, editing and design for the print media. Students will develop skills in news judgment, document-based information gathering, interviewing, observation and description, news and feature writing, ethics, page layout, headline writing, copy editing, content editing, and photo editing.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J510 Media and Society Seminar
Description: (cr. 3)
9 am to noon, Daily, EP 102, Open to Graduate Students only. Obtain on-line authorization from department. Above course required for the broadcast track.
Monday, July 30 – Friday, August 17.
Examination of structure, functions, ethics, and performance of communication and mass media, stressing a review of pertinent research literature. Analysis of media policies and performance in light of communication theory and current economic, political, and social thought.
JOUR-J514 International Communication
Description: (cr. 3)
Comparative analysis of international media systems. Course topics and geographical regions studied vary from semester to semester.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J516 Digital Journalism Practicum
Description: (cr. 6)
JOUR-J517 Advanced Digital Journalism Practicum
Description: (cr. 6)
This course is a continuation of J516: Digital Journalism Practicum and is open to Digital Journalism track students only.
JOUR-J518 Devices of Wonder: New Media, New Identities, New Social Movements
Description: (cr. 4)
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Requires application process. Must be at least Sophomore standing. Majors only.
Professor Hans Ibold will guide students through the world of social media and new technologies. The class includes attending South by Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas, where students attend conference sessions with professionals on the bleeding edge of new media innovation, meet high-profile journalists and new media professionals, and explore the local art and music.
Travel over spring break is a required component of this course. Travel for this course is dictated by the dates of the SXSW conference; please note that some days of regular coursework will be missed.
JOUR-J518 Ethnic Minority Media
Description: (cr. 4)
For people whose heritage isn’t the same as that of the larger society around them, the mass media can provide both links to their own culture and negotiations with the other cultures that color the immediate landscape. In this dual role, the newspapers, magazines, radio stations, television stations, and websites that serve ethnic minority groups must take on roles that differ sharply from those of the “mainstream” media.
This course will look at those roles and how the people who create the media enact them. We will explore and discuss ethnic minority groups around the world and the media that serve them. As our prime common example, we will examine the ethnic-minority mediascape in Vancouver, British Columbia—one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world. Each student will explore an additional ethnic minority media outlet from another part of the world as well.
Limited to Journalism graduate students. Thanksgiving break travel required to Vancouver, Canada. Travel dates November 18-25, 2012.
Contact Michael Evans, for permission.
JOUR-J518 International Media Experiences: In the Footsteps of Ernie Pyle
Description: (cr. 4)
Class requires travel to Europe during Spring Break March 11-20.
JOUR-J518 International Media Experiences: International Reporting
Description: (cr. 4)
Class requires travel to Japan during Spring Break March 10-19.
JOUR-J518 International Media Experiences: Media of Color - Ethnic and Indigenous Communications Worldwide
Description: (cr. 4)
Class requires Spring Break travel to Australia.
JOUR-J518 Media and Culture in China
Description: (cr. 4)
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Requires application process. Must be at least Sophomore standing. Majors only.
Students will explore the differences between the western-style free press and state-sponsored media in China. Students will develop a better understanding of the history, functions and current state of media in China. Over spring break, students will visit Beijing, explore Chinese media organizations, meet with Chinese journalism students, and experience Chinese culture first-hand.
Travel over spring break is a required component of this course.
This course meets with J418. Authorization from department is required.
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses, Journalism Electives
JOUR-J518 Media in Latin America
Description: (cr. 4)
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Requires application process. Must be at least Sophomore standing. Majors only.
Student explore the media environment in Latin America, and specifically Chile. Students will spend the semester studying issues in an assigned country, and then will together explore the media environment in Santiago in May, including meeting their Chilean counterparts.
Travel after the spring semester, May 8-18,2012, is a required component of this course. However, this is still a spring semester course.
This class meets with J418. Authorization from department is required.
JOUR-J518 Public Relations/Italy
Description: (cr. 4)
Class requires travel to Italy during Spring Break.
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses, Journalism Electives
JOUR-J518 Reporting Global Issues Locally
Description: (cr. 4)
Requires Spring Break travel to St. Petersburg, FL.
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses, Journalism Electives
JOUR-J518 Reporting HIV/AIDS in Africa
Description: (cr. 4)
Open to Graduate students only.
P: Graduate students: JOUR-J 505 or exemption. Requires travel to Eldoret and Nairobi, Kenya. Dates: May 18-June 17. Cost is: $2,250. Application required. By permission only.
JOUR-J518 Reporting Issues Locally
Description: (cr. 4)
Prerequisite: Permission of department. Requires application process. Must be at least Sophomore standing. Majors only.
Class requires travel to St. Petersburg, Florida during Spring Break.
JOUR-J520 Seminar in Visual Communication
Description: (cr. 3)
Integration of advanced visual communication skills, including photography, writing, and editing. Individual projects in packaging news and public affairs information. Emphasis on experimentation with message forms outside constraints of the traditional news media.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J525 Colloquium in Scholastic Journalism
Description: (cr. 1-3)
Examination of problems in teaching journalism and supervising school publications. Topics may include impact on scholastic journalism of changes in educational philosophy, law, financial support, and technology. May be repeated for state certification to teach secondary school journalism, but no more than 6 credits may be counted toward graduate degree. Meets with J453.
 
Categories: Special Schedule Activities
JOUR-J525 Digital Photography & Photo Editing
Description: (cr. 2-3)
Sharpen your photo storytelling and editing skills as you receive hands-on experience shooting assignments on digital cameras and editing images for publication and the Internet on the latest computer software. Also learn to collect and edit sound for basic multimedia presentations. Computer applications include Adobe Photoshop CS4, Expressions Media, and Photo Mechanic for imaging and editing digital pictures. Applications for teaching and advising student media in the secondary school also included.
 
Categories: High School Journalism Institute
JOUR-J525 High School Journalism Teacher Workshop: Methods of Teaching Journalism
Description: (cr. 2-3)
Obtain online authorization for section from department.
JOUR-J525 High School Journalism Teacher Workshop: Paying for and Promoting Student Media
Description: (cr. 2-3)
Obtain online authorization for above section from department.
JOUR-J525 Reinvent & Redesign Your Publication
Description: (cr. 2-3)
Our goal is to redesign your publication, be it a newspaper, news magazine or yearbook. We'll start with the fundamentals in design, visuals, graphics and typography. We'll quickly move into the trends from a wide array of publications. Along the way, we'll tackle daily exercises to strengthen your design skills. We'll critique your publications, look at others for inspiration, explore story-telling tools. It will be a busy but productive week. We'll try to have some fun along the way.
 
Categories: High School Journalism Institute
JOUR-J525 Supervision of Student Media
Description: (cr. 3)
Lectures, projects and discussion on legal and ethical aspects of advising school media and on designing, producing and financing school-produced student media, including print, broadcast and online media.
JOUR-J528 Public Relations Management
Description: (cr. 3)
Designed to enable students to manage a public relations department. Theories and principles relevant to public relations practiced in agency, corporate, and not-for-profit organizations will be covered. This will include developing goals and objectives, working with clients, developing budgets, and research methods.
JOUR-J529 Public Relations Campaigns
Description: (cr. 3)
Designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and execute a Public relations campaign for a local not-for-profit organization. Students will be exposed to relevant Public relations theory and in-depth case study analysis.
JOUR-J530 Issues in New Communication Technology
Description: (cr. 3)
Study of the political, economic, social, legal, and historical issues involved in the introduction and diffusion of communication technologies. Research on the uses and potential effects of new technologies on the structure and practice of journalism and mass media.
JOUR-J531 Public Relations for Nonprofits
Description: (cr. 3)
This graduate seminar focuses on how a nonprofit organization creates images and how it shapes its programs and goals to gain public support. Assignments and readings are designed to foster a theoretical and practical understanding of promotional techniques and campaigns using journalistic and other media.
JOUR-J542 Arts, Media, and Society
Description: (cr. 3)
Study of issues in arts journalism and the role of the arts in mass
media and society. Lectures by guest experts and independent research on current trends and problems in the field, emphasizing the public affairs aspects of the arts.
JOUR-J544 Science, Society, and Media
Description: (cr. 3)
An examination of science in society, with a particular look at research and commentary on media coverage of science and technology. Reading, reflection, and discussion of both theoretical and practical issues, and independent reading and research on a topic of the student's own choosing.
JOUR-J551 Seminar: Reporting the Law
Description: (cr. 3)
Study of public affairs aspects of the law. Research and reporting on timely topics pertaining to the courts, the legal profession, and law enforcement agencies particularly as they relate to the social-political-economic order.
JOUR-J552 Seminar: Reporting the Arts
Description: (cr. 3)
Course provides students with training in the coverage of the arts. Writing assignments range from feature articles to news to criticism for the journalistic media. Course includes coverage of issues revolving around the arts and society. Of value also to those who plan to write about the arts for promotion or development purposes. Close attention is given to information gathering and writing. Good opportunity for a student to sharpen writing skills in an area of special interest
JOUR-J553 Education and the Media
Description: (cr. 3)
Study of problems and issues in such areas as school finance, curriculum development, teaching methodology, and the politics of education. Research and reporting on current trends in the field.
JOUR-J554 Science Writing
Description: (cr. 3)
Exploration of the challenges and opportunities associated with writing about science for nonscientists. Reading and discussion of articles and texts about communicating science to nonscientists, and practical exercises in reporting and writing.
JOUR-J554 Science Writing (Summer - 1st 4 weeks)
Description: (cr. 3)
2:45 pm – 5:05 pm, Daily, EP 208, Open to Graduate Students only. First 4 weeks, Tuesday, May 8 to Friday, June 1.
Exploration of the challenges and opportunities associated with writing about science for nonscientists. Reading and discussion of articles and texts about communicating science to nonscientists, and practical exercises in reporting and writing.
JOUR-J555 Teaching Mass Communications in College
Description: (cr. 3)
Exploration of the theory and practice of college pedagogy. Specific attention to skills required for teaching mass communications. Includes development of a new course syllabus and teaching portfolio.
JOUR-J556 Seminar: Urban Affairs Reporting
Description: (cr. 3)
Study of current urban problems, such as air pollution, transportation, inner-city redevelopment, ghetto life, and metropolitan government. Research and reporting on timely topics.
JOUR-J560 Building an Online Portfolio
Description: (cr. 2)
Graduate students only
This online skills course, taught by web programmer/online education coordinator, Andrew Koop, teaches students how to create an attractive and easily maintainable online portfolio that represents an ongoing body of professional work.
Students will individually select their best work, build a portfolio site with instructor guidance, and work in classmate critique teams to refine. The course’s final assignment is a finished portfolio along with classmate critiques.
Most modules in the course are asynchronous to accommodate a variety of student schedules. Correspondence will take place through Oncourse’s Forum, Chat, and Messages tools.
JOUR-J560 Building an Online Portfolio (2nd 8 weeks)
Description: (cr. 3)
J560 Building an Online Portfolio is an 8-week online skills course that teaches students how to create an attractive and easily maintainable online portfolio that represents an ongoing body of professional work.
Students individually select their best work, build a portfolio site with instructor guidance, and work in classmate critique teams to refine. The course’s final assignment is a finished portfolio along with classmate critiques.
Most modules in the course are asynchronous to accommodate a variety of student schedules. Correspondence occurs through a variety of methods: Oncourse (forum posts, text chat, Adobe Connect, messages), Skype, email, and traditional office hours.
 
Categories: Second Eight Weeks
JOUR-J560 Covering Murder and Mayhem
Description: (cr. 3)
Covering Murder and Mayhem is an advanced reporting class that teaches how to pursue deadline stories on murders and other major crimes. The students will learn how to gather and write daily stories from the police and courts beats. You must have access to a car or other transportation and must be ready to tackle sensitive subjects under intense deadline.
JOUR-J560 Framing Theory
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Informational Graphics (Summer - 1st 4 weeks)
Description: (cr. 3)
10:20 am – 12:30 pm, Daily, EP 210, Cookman, C. Requires special fee--see fee page in the Enrollment and Student Academic Information bulletin. Open to Graduate Students only. First 4 weeks, Tuesday, May 8 to Friday, June 1.
JOUR-J560 Literary Journalism
Description: (cr. 3)
Borrowing the techniques of fiction, literary journalists tell stories that invite readers into the action. Read some of their best work and try your hand at this challenging form. We'll draw on an anthology, The Art of Fact (Kerrane, Yagoda), read Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild, and use the web to explore literary journalism in newspapers. You'll write several long pieces, each emphasizing a different kind of reporting experience and narrative strategy. We'll "workshop" your pieces together, a process that will sharpen your editing skills, and talk about where you might publish them.
About the instructor: Carol Polsgrove is author of It Wasn't Pretty, Folks, But Didn't We Have Fun? Esquire in the Sixties; Divided Minds: Intellectuals and the Civil Rights Movement, and Ending British Rule in Africa: Writers in a Common Cause (to be published this summer). She has been an editor at Mother Jones and The Progressive and has written for Sierra, The Atlantic, The Nation, The American Prospect, and other magazines.
JOUR-J560 NewsGrid
Description: (cr. 3)
<p>Are you interested in innovative graphics that uncover revealing trends in the world? In this course, visual theory and news production blend together. Students will study information visualizations and, in turn, produce NewsGrid, an innovative web show that uses sound, video and animation creatively to highlight those visuals. In the first half of the course, students will learn how to shoot video and brainstorm show ideas. For the second half, students will generate three entertaining shows highlighting IV concepts.</p>
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-J560 Principles of Public Relations
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Public Relations Writing
Description: (cr. 3)
The primary goal of the course is to help students develop the professional writing skills expected of beginning public relations practitioners with special emphasis on the different approaches required for particular audiences and media. Class will focus on the basics of good writing-grammar, punctuation, sentence structure-as well as the art of writing-word choice, rhythm, nuance, tone. Students will learn how to change their writing styles to suit different communications tools. The pace and content of the course will be tailored to the abilities of the students enrolled. Because this is a service-learning course in which students produce public relations materials for a community organization, the class will also learn the fundamentals of effective client relations.
JOUR-J560 Race and the Media
Description: (cr. 3)
Open to Graduate Students only.
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium (2cr)
Description: (cr. 2)
Second eight weeks only.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium (3cr)
Description: (cr. 3)
Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Business of Sports Media
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Communication for Non-Profits
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Crisis Communication
Description: (cr. 2)
First eight weeks only.
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Crisis Management in Health
Description: (cr. 3)
P: Junior/senior standing, JOUR-J 200 or JOUR-J 321 with a grade of C or better and instructor permission
Crisis management is most often aligned with an unusual, unplanned and often a catastrophic event such as natural disasters, terrorism activities and airplane crashes among others. Frequently these events are contained in small geographic areas yet others have more far reaching and long-lasting effects. A health crisis can take many forms ranging from situations with food, pharmaceutical product recalls or new warnings about their use, to pandemics, epidemics and governmental regulation relating to changes to policy and medical insurance coverage. This course explores meaningful case studies addressing a variety of crises effecting public health and potential solutions the media can help create to inform the public and advocate change to resolve issues that put the public at risk. This graduate course is open to junior and senior undergraduates who have a distinct interest in health issues and communication. To be considered for this course students should submit a brief application describing their specific health interests and why they should be considered for this course. The application should be no longer than 250 words and should be sent to elliotdd@indiana.edu.
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Digital Journalism
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Foreign News Coverage
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Health Reporting
Description: (cr. )
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: International Reporting
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Media and International Affairs
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J560 Topics Colloquium: Video Storytelling
Description: (cr. 3)
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-J562 History of Twentieth-Century Photography
Description: (cr. 3)
Surveys twentieth century photography as a medium of art and communication. Considers portraiture, landscape, still life, the nude, conceptual photography, the social documentary tradition, the magazine picture story, fashion, advertising and war photography. Examines the impact of postmodern theories on photographic practice and the understanding of photography.
JOUR-J563 Computerized Publication Design I
Description: (cr. 3)
This publishing design course incorporates typesetting, electronic photo editing, graphics, and page design. Students are instructed in design theory, computer publishing skills, and creative problem solving.
JOUR-J565 Computerized Publication Design II
Description: (cr. 3)
This advanced publishing design course builds on J563 Computerized Design I and incorporates advanced work in color, type design, computer illustration, creative problem solving, and an introduction to print production.
JOUR-J570 Theory and Research: Individual Level
Description: (cr. 3)
Introduction to the theory and research relevant to mass media studies at the individual level of analysis. Corresponds to R541 in the telecommunications department.
JOUR-J571 Theory and Research: Macro-Social Level
Description: (cr. 3)
Introduction to theoretical orientations and research findings at the macro-social level of analysis.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J572 The Press and the Constitution
Description: (cr. 3)
Seminar on specialized topics concerning the rights and obligations of mass media under the Bill of Rights. Research and discussion on law of privacy, access, and other constitutional problems.
JOUR-J573 Ethnographic Reporting and Writing
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J574 Gender and Media
Description: (cr. 3)
This course takes the approach that gender is a social, cultural, and economic phenomenon, not merely a biological construct. Hence, we start with the fundamental question “How do males become men and how do females become women?” Throughout the semester, we will examine the ways in which other social categories and identities—race, class, age, and sexual orientation—are central to the creation and maintenance of gender differences. This course seeks to expose you to current and cutting-edge work in the broad interdisciplinary arena of gender and media; hence, the course readings and class discussions will address the complex ways in which conceptions of gender structure the economic and cultural landscape of media including newspapers, television, magazines, advertising, billboards, and photography. The course will go beyond the geographic borders of the United States to consider the relations between gender and media culture in Europe and Asia.
Taking a cultural studies approach to the media, course materials focus on masculinity and femininity in media texts, media production processes, and audience reception. While the emphasis of the course on media texts reflects the prolific research in this area, my goal in allocating much of the semester to readings on media representations is to offer you examples of research that can guide your thinking on your own final projects. The range of topics in the portion of the course on media texts includes consumer culture, television news, feminism, sexual violence, celebrities, masculinity, gay and lesbian media, and youth culture. In the section on media production, we will examine the institutional (state and corporate) deployment of gender in the marketplace and in the workforce. Finally, the course introduces students to studies of audiences so we can learn about readers’ and viewers’ engagement with media representations of gender in their everyday lives. For their major assignment, students will critique the social construction of gender in a set of media texts of their choice.
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-J575 Student Press Law and Ethics
Description: (cr. 2-3)
This course is designed for both experienced and relatively inexperienced scholastic journalism teachers and media advisers. We will cover legal and ethical issues in the media, especially as they apply to teaching and advising high school publications and media staffs. The course will examine the basics of media law, ethical decision-making as it pertains to school publication situations, and legal and ethical cases and situations especially relevant to high school newspapers and yearbooks.
 
Categories: High School Journalism Institute
JOUR-J576 High School Journalism Teacher Workshop: Management of Student Publications
Description: (cr. 2-3)
Obtain online authorization for section from department
JOUR-J576 Management of School Publications
Description: (cr. 2-3)
 
Categories: Special Schedule Activities
JOUR-J577 Yearbook Advising
Description: (cr. 2-3)
Advisers and prospective yearbook advisers will learn principles of yearbook management, including the important business aspects of advising, as well as yearbook production, design, writing, and legal and ethical issues relevant to yearbook supervision and advising. For beginning or experienced yearbook sponsors, this workshop also includes projects to help advisers keep their staffs organized by preparation of relevant policies, staff job descriptions and tips for how to work with administrators and others in building lasting support for a quality scholastic yearbook program.
 
Categories: High School Journalism Institute
JOUR-J592 Media Internship
Description: (cr. 1-3)
By permission only.
Professional experience in media. Students hold work assignments with media organizations. Grading is on an S/F basis. Arranged through the associate dean for graduate
studies office.
 
Categories: Special Courses
JOUR-J600 Quantitative Methods in Mass Communication Research
Description: (cr. 3) Requires a grade of C- or better in the following: J500
Prequisites: J500 or R500, and one statistics course. Advanced behavioral methods in the analysis of mass communication data. Practice in analyzing data with computerized statistical programs.
JOUR-J614 Globalization, Media, and Social Change
Description: (cr. 3)
Globalization remains an imperfect, but ubiquitous term that is widely used in academia and in the business, policy, and cultural arenas to define, explain, and justify the economic, political, and technological forces that shape the lives of citizens across the world. This course seeks to critically examine the phenomena that comprise globalization and explore the role that media technologies (newspapers, magazines, television, and online media) and media genres (news and popular culture) play in constituting our identities as audiences, citizens, workers, consumers, and activists. The topics addressed in the course include globalization and media theory, issues of hybridity and national identity, dilemmas in ethnographic research and fieldwork, journalism and journalists, cultural representations of globalization processes, migration and urbanization, and online activism.
JOUR-J624 Russian and East European Area Media Systems
Description: (cr. 3)
Investigation of theory and practice of communications systems in the region, including history, news content, institutions, journalists, technology, economic and political pressures, as well as audience and international influences.
JOUR-J650 History and Philosophy of the Media
Description: (cr. 3)
Lectures and discussion on the origins, the historical growth, and the philosophical roots of the communication media, with particular emphasis on the relationship between the media and political, economic, social, and cultural trends in the United States.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J651 Qualitative Methods in Mass Communication Research
Description: (cr. 3)
Seminar on qualitative, historical, and legal research methods for mass communication research.
 
Categories: General Courses
JOUR-J653 The Media in the Twentieth Century
Description: (cr. 3)
Seminar on topics in the history and philosophy of the communication media in the twentieth century, stressing both continuity and change in an age of rapid technological growth for print and electronic media in the United States and in selected areas of the world.
JOUR-J655 Ethics and Journalism
Description: (cr. 3)
Exploration of the role of ethics in journalism. Using literature that examines ethics in the context of journalism practice, the course will analyze ways journalists attempt to deny or limit the role of ethical values. Special attention to objectivity, freedom, and casuistry.
JOUR-J660 Comparing Mass Media - US & Europe
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J660 First Amendment Theory
Description: (cr. 3)
9:10 am – 10:10 am, Daily, EP 207, Open to Graduate Students only. First 8 weeks Tuesday, May 8 to Friday, June 29.
JOUR-J660 Framing Theory and the Media
Description: (cr. 3)
Open to graduates only.
JOUR-J660 Media and International Affairs
Description: (cr. 3)
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-J660 Public Opinion
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J660 Topics Colloquium
Description: (cr. 3)
Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit.
JOUR-J660 Topics Colloquium: Agenda Setting
Description: (cr. 3)
This graduate course provides an overview of the research on agenda setting. Since the first study of media agenda setting was published in Public Opinion Quarterly in the summer of 1972, there have been hundreds of replications and expansions, including studies not only of the relationship between media agendas and public/policy agendas, but also between agendas of different media and at different levels of abstraction (first-level and second-level). Contingent conditions that enhance or reduce agenda-setting effects have also been tested empirically, such as need for orientation.
This is both a readings and research seminar that aims to acquaint you with major studies of agenda setting in the first half of the semester and also provides an opportunity for you to do some original research on agenda setting in the second half of the semester.
JOUR-J660 Topics Colloquium: Publics in Communication Management
Description: (cr. 3)
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-J660 Topics Colloquium: Statistics
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J660 Topics Colloquium: The Global Journalist
Description: (cr. 3)
JOUR-J672 Topics in Communication Law
Description: (cr. 3)
Independent research and roundtable analysis of selected problems in communication law.
JOUR-J673 Government and Mass Media
Description: (cr. 3)
Independent research and roundtable analysis of political communication and government-media relations.
JOUR-J700 Specialized Reporting Project
Description: (cr. 3)
By permission only.
 
Categories: Special Courses
JOUR-J800 M.A. Thesis or Creative Project
Description: (cr. 3)
By permission only.
This course is eligible for a deferred grade.
 
Categories: Special Courses
JOUR-J804 Readings and Research in Journalism
Description: (cr. 1-9)
By permission only.
This course is eligible for a deferred grade.
 
Categories: Special Courses
JOUR-J805 Graduate Research Colloquium
Description: (cr. 1-9)
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-G599 Thesis Research
Description: (cr. 0)
By permission only.
JOUR-G741 Ph.D. Research in Mass Communications
Description: (cr. arr.)
This course is eligible for a deferred grade.
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-G790 Readings and Research in Mass Communications
Description: (cr. 1-3)
This course is eligible for a deferred grade.
 
Categories: Graduate School Courses
JOUR-G901 Advanced Research
Description: (cr. 6)
Masters students who have enrolled in 30 or more hours of graduate work applicable to the degree and who have completed all other degree requirements.